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Drought in Cape Town

Ground water options

Ground water options

Ground water in the Western Cape tends to have quantities of dissolved iron and the pH tends to be on the low side.  This machine on the right addresses several of these issues.
  • Corrects pH
  • removes iron
  • filters out turbidity
  • disinfects
  • stores treated water and
  • supplies treated water under pressure to the house.
  • fully automated and linked to the well or borehole pump
 
January 19th 2017

January 19th 2017


Since January 4th, dam levels have been dropping by 1643 megalitres per day.
Well point water - reservoirs a few meters underground

Well point water – reservoirs a few meters underground

A good old fashioned hand pump.  This technology has been around for some time.  It involves incrementally lifting water in a pipe.  There is a non-return flow valve at the bottom of the well point pipe.  Each crank of the lever brings a slug of water to the surface.  The deeper the ground water, the harder it is to pump the water up. Well points are typically less than 10 m deep.  Modern day self priming electric pumps can draw water from a theoretical maximum of 9.8m.   This upper limit is linked to atmosphearic pressure at sea level which is slightly more than one bar.  One bar of pressure can also be expressed as a static water head of 10m. To abstract water from depths greater than 10m, a pump would have to be installed in the water.  This type of pump could be a borehole pump or a submersible pump.
January 6th 2018

January 6th 2018

Since December 21st, dam levels in Cape Town have been dropping by 1,400 megalitres per day. Level 6 water restrictions are now in place. This means;
  1. 87 litres per person per day
  2. Residential properties using more than 10,500 litres per month will be fined.  Commercial properties are to reduce consumption by 45%, measured from 2015
  3. Use of borehole water is discouraged.  Boreholes and wellpoints to be registered.
  4. Recycled/reclaimed water re-use for toilet flushing encouraged
  5. No municipal water for
    1. swimming pools
    2. ponds or water features
    3. car wash
    4. sports fields or gardens
5th January 2018

5th January 2018

December 21st 2017

December 21st 2017

  Values in hover brackets are capacity (x1000 mega litres) and % of capacity
December 21st 2017

December 21st 2017

Water tanker delivering borehole water - seen near Stellenbosch
At the moment Level 5 Water restrictions are in place
Level 5 water restrictions are in effect until 31 December 2017.
Level 6 water restrictions will be implemented from 1 January 2018.
December 18th 2017

December 18th 2017

November 24th 2017

November 24th 2017

With dwindling Municipal water supply in the Western cape, many home owners are considering using alternative water sources. Options for the home include rain water or ground water. In rare cases, sewage recycling is also a possibility. At the moment the Cape Town City by-law does not allow alternative water use, although with day zero on the horizon, pragmatism is holding sway. The municipality does, however, insist that an RPZ valve be installed at the water supply entry point to the home. RPZ stands for reduced pressure zone. This is a belts and braces no-nonsense non-return valve. The RPZ will prevent any non-municipal water entering their network. This is not an unreasonable requirement. It would not be particularly neighbourly if one man’s iron rich well-point water is used for mixing scotch on the other side of the hedge. The RPZ is a multichambered device that prevents water return to the municipal network under a variety of conditions. Valve failure mostly occurs when debris is lodged at the shut-off interfaces. The RPZ backflow preventer makes allowance for such eventualities, guaranteeing Municipal protection at all times. Have a look at this useful clip; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQFrSnm2V6U